Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Ultra-Quickies: A Hypothetical Alteration To The Franchise

     Imagine, just for the sake of an interesting thought experiment, that instead of being an individual property, the vote were a family property. That is: the privilege of casting a vote in some election would apply to a recognized family, perhaps as registered with the local school district.

     That’s one vote. For the entire family. Not one for Dad, one for Mom, and one for each spratling over the age of eighteen.

Which member of the family, in your estimation, would be most likely to decide how that vote would be cast?

     Give your opinions in the comments.

14 comments:

Col. B. Bunny said...

Dad, after consultation with the rest of the family.

Tim Turner said...

I fear if that was the way it was done, my wife and I wouldn't "be" a family.

Anonymous said...

It would be decided by the strongest in the family.

CGHill said...

Most likely Mom, because Dad tends toward apathy.

earthdog said...

Dad. I'd consult with Mom, but that's as far as it would go. My children are neither in the military or at least 35 years of age - they therefore don't rate a vote.

daniel_day said...

In my family's case, that would be me, also known as "Dad". "Dad" in most families as well, I guess.

Howard Nelson said...

Mother. Mothers know best the pain and gratitude for producing new life and will confirm that thankfulness in their judgements of other life issues.

pdwalker said...

Dad, but my mother would have a say because she keeps herself informed and tries to make rational decisions. Yeah, NAWALT.

My family? Me. Wife doesn't give a shit and the kids are still too ignorant.

syd B. said...

Dad, but only after being told who to vote for, by Mom.

pdwalker said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ron Olson said...

If you have a functioning family it would be Dad. Some of the more art nouveaux type families it might well be a cockatoo.

Weetabix said...

Me.

Anonymous said...

My wife and my son accepted my reasoning about my political views, so for my family, I'd be the decision maker. Pretty much seemed the same way (generally) among my circle of friends and acquaintances. (1970s/1980s era.)

FWIW, at around age 24, my son commented that back in his teens, where he had disagreed with me, time had proven him incorrect. Amazing how parents get smarter with age. :-)

Best regards,

Desertrat

Bob Durtschi said...

After consulting together on the subject we decided it would be one of us, the parents. Most likely the one that was most free to visit the polls. In the past it would be after informing the children of our decision in family counsel. We did that when I lost my job for a weekend. With all moved away and in the process of forming their own families we skip that last step.